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Back in Maui and I cannot wait for my first Scalloped Hammerhead Shark dive off of Molokai.  We come back here each year for this dive and it is one of my favorite dives on the planet.  The rich biodiversity of this dive site, the great topography and of course, the Scalloped Hammerheads.

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark, Sphyrna lewini, Molokai Hawaii, Moku Ho’oniki Rock

I have been diving on this site now for over 10 years and it never gets old.  It is an advanced dive and the seas can be quite rough but oh, what a dive.  I dive the site with Lahaina Divers, which is the only dive operator on Maui that goes to this site.  Lahaina Divers is a great dive company, extremely professional and competent with a number of diver professionals that have been on Maui for a number of years.

 

 

Mokuhooniki Rock

Mokuhooniki rock is situated off the northeastern point of Molokai in the Pailolo Channel. The trip takes about an hour from of Lahaina Harbor.  You do a two-tank dive on the site with a surface interval of about 45 minutes.  I dive this on Nitrox to help with bottom time, especially given the short surface interval.  This will also allow you to descend to depth when needed for that perfect shot. The dive site ranges from 60 to 110 feet although at the end of the dive you could be in water that is over 150 feet.

The Scalloped Hammerhead Shark, Sphyrna lewini is an amazing creature. The adult can reach up to 14 feet in length but those found around Mokuhooniki rock tend to be around 6 to 10 feet in length.   They typically can be found swimming alone or in small groups of 2 and 3s.  However, there are times when these sharks begin to gather especially towards the summer where you can see dozens swimming together on this site.

Scalloped Hammerhead

The Scalloped Hammerhead Shark tends to be a very shy shark.  The worse thing any diver can do is to swim aggressively toward the

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark

Interaction – Scalloped Hammerhead Shark, Sphyrna lewini, Molokai Hawaii

shark with their GoPro hoping for that amazing shot.  The result, of this behavior, is the shark will turn and swim away and deny the rest of the dive group a chance to interact with the shark.  The best way to observe most sharks is to stay still or move slowly.  The Scalloped Hammerhead is curious and if your dive group is still and chill you may well get an encounter you will never forget.  I have had these marvelous sharks circle me for over 7 minutes on on a dive.  But again, your group typically needs to be very relaxed to be able to get these sharks interact with you and the rest of your dive buddies.

I like to stay around 60 to 65 feet and look into the blue to spot the sharks.  When I see some that are close or look like they may come in close I slowly descend to their depth, typically about 80 to 90 feet.  However, these sharks can be anywhere in the water column so make sure you keep your head on a swivel.  I like to stay on the outside of  the dive group and towards Molokai on this dive.  Typically, I stay about 10  meters away from Dive Master.  This position allows me to better interact with the sharks without worrying as much about other divers behavior.  However, you will encounter sharks close to Mokuhooniki Rock and in the middle of the channel.  So don’t worry, just keep looking and watching your dive guide.

This is amazing dive site.  Take your time and enjoy.

The pool is open

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Scalloped Hammerhead - Elegance in Motion

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark- Elegance in Motion

A south swell has been running for several days with the wind blowing briskly out of the north.  It is Friday morning and I am looking forward to scuba diving with the Hammerhead Shark.  The dive site for today is about an hour from Lahaina Harbor across the Pailolo Channel and on the northeastern end of Molokai.  This dive will take approximately five hours from the time we leave the harbor until our return.

I checked into the Lahaina Divers shop, whom I highly recommend, around 6:50 am. I have been diving with them in Maui for over 10 years.  They have great boats and a skilled and highly professional crew.  Lahaina Divers is the only dive operation that has a regular Hammerhead Shark dive to Molokai.  After checking in, I park my car and then head down to the boat slip.  After all of the divers are aboard and a short safety briefing from the crew we head for Molokai.  A

Large Scalloped Hammerhead

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark – Encounter with 12 foot female

few of the divers on board have done this dive, including myself, many times.  However, for most on board this will be their fist dive on Molokai and the first time with Hammerhead sharks.

The Boat

The boat heads toward the dive site, staying close to the western shore of Maui, until we are almost directly across from the dive site.  The boat then makes a sharp turn to cross the channel.  The seas are running four to six feet with an occasional swell in excess of eight feet.  Some first timers on the boat get a bit nervous.  It takes about 25 to 30 minutes to cross over to Molokai and by that time a couple of divers on the boat that are sea sick.  This channel is one of the roughest in the Hawaiian islands.  Its name literally means “crazy fishermen”.  Because if someone was going to go fishing across this channel they must be crazy.

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark - Exploration

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark – Exploration

The captain of the boat gives us a 10 minute warning telling us it is time to put on our gear and get ready to enter the water.  We put on our wet suits, BC’s, and fins while sitting in assigned stations on the boat.  The water is rough so we wait on the crew to help us stand up and move into position at the back of the boat.  But, we don’t enter yet.  We wait for the captain to move the boat into position and give us the signal to enter the water.  The crew tells us “1 minute”, “30 seconds”, “captain divers are ready”, then we wait for the captain.  The back of the boat swings round toward the islet, then the captain yells “dive, dive, dive”.  Our group jumps almost in unison and we are all in the water within 15 seconds.

 

The Dive

The surface is choppy and after making sure all divers are OK, we rapidly begin our descent.  The water is light to medium blue for the first thirty to forty feet with rays of sunlight filtering around us.  Then the water begins to slowly darken as we descend on the dive site know as Fish Rain.  The reef is on our right and blue water is to the left.  The bottom slopes gently downward from about 40 feet to around 120 feet.  While I love the reef, I constantly look into the blue, hoping to see a Scalloped Hammerhead Shark.

Fish Rain is located on Mokuhooniki Rock and is one of the most bio-diverse dive sites on the planet.  The density of marine species, the health of the corals and the presence of pelagics make this a must dive. But, again we have come to see the Hammerhead Shark.

Scalloped Hammerhead Close Up

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark Close Up

Advanced Dive

The dive starts out in the lee of the islet which is somewhat protected from the crazy waters of the Pailolo Channel.  While this site can on rare occasion be like glass, it most often has swells of 2 to 4 feet and can grow on occasion to well over 6 feet.  This is not a dive for the novice diver.  This is an advanced dive and anyone thinking about going should carefully consider their level of experience and confidence.

You enter the water quickly from a moving boat a quickly descend to around 50 feet.  After your dive group assembles you will slowly make you way around the Islet in an arc.  The dive is a drift dive and can be one of the most difficult dives you will every make due to the entry into and exit from the water.  Again this dive is not for the novice, but oh what a dive.  I have been on this site dozens and dozens of times yet it never ceases to amaze me.

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark

Scalloped Hammerhead In Close

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark In Close

The Scalloped Hammerhead (Sphyrna lewini) is a species of hammerhead shark, and part of the family Sphyrnidae. This shark can be found over continental and insular shelves and in nearby deeper water. It is found in warm temperate and tropical waters, worldwide from 46°N to 36°S. It can be found down to depths over 500 m (1,600 ft), but is most often found above 25 m (82 ft).[10] During the day, they are more often found close to shore, and at night, they hunt further offshore. Adults are found alone, in pairs, or in small schools, while young sharks occur in larger schools.[1] see this Wikipedia article for more details on Scalloped Hammerhead Sharks

The Scalloped Hammerhead Shark in Hawaii has been known to reach lengths of up to 13 feet however 6-8 feet is typically the average.  Near Mokuhooniki Rock, the Scalloped Hammerheads tend to be adults of 6 to 8 feet with the occasional shark measuring well over 10 feet.  These sharks can be found from very near the surface to about 130 ft.  We see them very often cruising just off the bottom of the channel between Molokai and Mokuhooniki Rock, where the depths run typically 100 to 130 feet.  We will see them in groups of 1 to 3 but many times you can see groups of 5 to 10 and occasionally many more.  On my best dive here I have just under 50 Scalloped Hammerheads and have been literally surrounded as I am taking photographs.

Observing Scalloped Hammerhead Sharks

These are magnificent creatures. It is a wonderful experience to remain absolutely still in the water and observe these sharks as they interact with you.  I have have had many occasions where sharks have swam with me for 10 to 15 minutes.  They are curious and will come in close to you and your group if you will remember a few key things:

  1. Keep your head on a swivel as you dive.  You want to be able to spot the sharks as soon as possible so your behavior does not cause them to move away from you
  2. When you see the sharks and you see they are heading in the general direction of your group slow down immediately and/or stop and observe their behavior
  3. If the sharks are moving away from your group keep swimming toward them and keep looking all around.  There are more than likely other sharks near by.
  4. Stay at 40 to 60 feet when you are looking for the sharks and then drop down to their depth when you see them.  This will conserve air and reduce the danger of nitrogen narcosis
  5. When the sharks are getting close to you stay still and let them swim to you.  I was getting ready for a wonderful encounter with a 12+foot female Scalloped Hammerhead Shark when a person in our dive group start swimming rapidly down towards the shark to get their “go-pro” shot.  The shark simply turned away and the diver probably did not get a good shot and the rest of the dive group was denied the experience of interacting with a large hammerhead.

The Pool Is Open

As I have said before, if not my very favorite, definitely in my top five.  This site has an amazing reef, tremendous bio-diversity, a very healthy reef system, does not see many divers and it has ….. Scalloped Hammerhead Sharks.

If you are an advanced diver, this site is definitely for you.  Maholo nui loa and safe diving.

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Silent……………Graceful……………Powerful……………

Hammerhead shark, MolokaiMany words can be used to describe the Scalloped Hammerhead Shark.  This apex hunter cruses about coastal warm temperate and tropical seas in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans between 46°N and 36°S from the surface to depths of 1,000 meters.  It may enter estuaries or be found in the open ocean, in large groups in the Galapagos, Malpelo, Cocos and Revillagigedo Islands and within the Gulf of California.  In Hawaii, on the island of Molokai, you can find groups of up to 60 or 70 sharks.  However, at Molokai you are more likely to see solitary individuals or perhaps small groups of 4 to 10 sharks.

In March, I was diving with Lahaina Divers on Molokai and had one of the best shark dives ever, interacting with almost 40 sharks over the course of two dives.  This dive site, off of Moku Ho’oniki rock on Molokai, is one of my favorite dive sites anywhere in the world.  I have made dozens of dives on this site and while I thoroughly recommend it, it is not for the average recreational diver.  While on many occasions this site can be reasonably calm (I have seen it where the surface is almost glass) it is one of the most unpredictable dive sites that I know.  In fact, I have been waiting to get Scalloped Hammerhead Shark, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W SMeltzer)picked up by the dive boat, at this site, when I am literally looking down on the boat (a two decker by the way) from the top of a wave.  The seas here can reach 10 feet in height or more and requires the diver to be experienced,  confident, under control and above all willing to adhere to instructions given by the dive master and boat captain.  If you are a novice diver, do not attempt to do this dive.  I have seen inexperienced divers, break ribs and have extreme difficulty reentering the dive boat.  So again, this is not a dive site recommended for anyone other than an advanced diver that has previous experience exiting and entering a dive boat while it is moving.

However, this is an awesome dive site.  The drop off location is called Fish Rain, and has a depth of 30 to 40 feet at the entry point and as you descend and look up you will think it is literally raining fish.  They are everywhere, the Hawaiian Dascyllus, all kinds of Butterflyfish, Angelfish, Moorish Idols, and many, many more.  Dozens of individuals to large schools of Hawaiian Dascyllus, Dascyllus albisella, Rainbow / Hawaiian Cleaner Wrasse, Labroides phthirophagus, Randall, 1958, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W SMeltzer)schools of many types of fish inhabit this very unique environment.  The site is to a depth of about 120 feet.  The sharks can be found anywhere from a few feet from the surface to cruising about along the bottom.  The site can have severe current, that can cause the inexperienced diver to rapidly consume their air supply. So again, this site is not for inexperienced divers.

When interacting with any shark, the key is patience.  The Hammerhead shark in particular, is a fairly shy species and if you swim rapidly toward the shark you will more than likely not see much more than a brief glimpse.  I have been on this site several times when an over anxious diver swims rapidly after every shadow they see and the rest of the divers do not see any sharks at all.  However, if you are patient and slow in your approach you may be rewarded with a wonderful encounter.

On this particular dive, we entered at Fish Rain, in the “shadow” of Moku Ho’oniki that provides a fairly calm spot to exit the dive boat.  As we descend I tend to stay on the outside shoulder of the dive master and about 30 to 50 feet from the nearest diver in the group.  I am constantly looking out and down, hunting for the elusive Hammerhead.

In the distance is see several shadows coming in towards me at about 80 feet.  I was hovering around 45 feet and dropped down slowly to “intercept” the group.  As I was waiting for the group to get in range I looked Scalloped Hammerhead Shark, Sphyrna lewini, Molokai Hawaii, Moku Ho'oniki Rock (StevenWSmeltzer.com   (949)290-6367, Steven W SMeltzer)back to my outside shoulder away from the rest of the divers and got a wonderful shot of this solitary shark coming in to check me out.  I can tell this is going to be a wonderful dive.  This particular individual swam with me at a distance of 10 to 15 feet from me for about 2 minutes and then gradually disappeared in the distance.  I move quickly back up to about 50 feet to conserve my bottom time feeling awesome.  We continued to drift with the current, which was really moving at this point, spotting several groups of 3 to 4 individuals and one group of eight sharks.  I about 35 minutes into the dive, I saw another individual at about 100 feet and quickly dropped down to see if I could get some interesting shots.  The black and white Scalloped Hammerhead Shark, Sphyrna lewini, Molokai Hawaii, Moku Ho'oniki Rock (StevenWSmeltzer.com   (949)290-6367, Steven W SMeltzer)image above is of this shark at about 120 feet and while I was descending through about 100 feet.  As I dropped down I kept checking around me and saw that four other individuals had now come fairly close to me from behind.  I was able to get a nice shot of the “school” and when I turned back the other way there were six shots directly in front of me and a couple about 10 feet above me.  Yahoo, what an awesome experience to encounter these marvelous creatures.   I slowly started to ascend, to keep my computer out of deco, and watched as each of these groups faded slowly in the distance.  During our two dives we counted well over 50 individual sights and estimate that we saw at least 35 individuals.  It was an awesome dive and keeps me wanting to go back for more.

The pool is open.

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Scuba Diving Molokai can be awesome, especially at Mokuhooniki Rock. The reef here is one of the most interesting that I have dove on anywhere on the planet. The variety of marine species, the isolation and the relatively untouched environment make this a one of a kind location.  But……we all come for the Hammerheads.

scuba diving Molokai

Mokuhooniiki Rock, Molokai

Mokuhooniki Rock or islet is located at 21 07′ 40″N, 156 42’20″W just off the North eastern coast of the island of Molokai.  This dive site, also known as Fish Rain, is one of my top ten scuba diving sites in the world.

Interacting with such a variety of marine life combined with the opportunity to spend time with large pelagic species makes this a special place.  When scuba diving Molokai Mokuhooniki Rock, you  encounter Hammerhead sharks on almost every dive.  You will also see a rich and diverse ecosystem containing large schools of Damsels and Butterflyfish to Dolphins, to Tiger Sharks and much much more.  You will be hard pressed to find other dive sites that have the abundance and variety of marine life in such a pristine condition.  If you are on Maui and you are an advanced diver, you simply must do this dive.

Scuba Diving Molokai – The Adventure

Scuba Diving Molokai (Steven W Smeltzer)

Spinner Dolphins Molokai Hawaii

This site can be adventure diving at its peak.  It takes about 45 minutes to an hour to go from the harbor in Lahaina to Mokuhooniiki Rock.  Crossing the Pailolo (means crazy fishermen) channel alone can bring seasoned divers to their knees.  It can be quite rough.  This is not a beginners dive site.  In fact even if you are an advanced rated diver, you should be extremely comfortable exiting a moving boat and reentering a moving boat in potentially rough and choppy seas.  I have been on this site dozens of times and while it can be like glass, it is extremely rare.  The site can also have 6+ foot waves.  I have seen divers break ribs on their reentry and others become extremely agitated and near panic on the pick up.  I remember one dive in particular where the waves, even in the lee of the rock, were running about 8 to 10 feet.  As the boat came around to pick us up I was literally on the top of one wave looking down at the captain of the boat who was on the top deck of a double deck dive boat.  The boat was some 5 feet or so below me in the trough of a wave.  I was thinking this is going to be a very interesting pickup.

But……what a great scuba diving site.

When scuba diving Molokai at Mokuhooniiki Rock, you enter the dive site typically in the lee of the islet on the right above.  The

Scuba Diving Molokai (Steven W Smeltzer)

Scalloped Hammerhead Shark, Sphyrna lewini, Molokai Hawaii, Moku Ho’oniki Rock

crew will let you know about ten minutes before it is time to enter the water.  They will begin lining you up at the back of the boat one at a time.  You will  have your mask and fins on, BC inflated and be holding anything you want to take into the water with you, including cameras.  If you have not entered a dive site from a moving boat before this will a bit of an adventure for you.  Think of it as channeling your inner Navy Seal.  When you are lined up at the back of the boat, the captain will swing the boat around toward the islet and when all divers are ready, the crew will say Divers Ready. They will then begin counting down two minutes, one minute, etc.  Then when the Captain gives his ok the crew will give you a signal “Dive, Dive, Dive”.  Do NOT enter the water before the crew has given you the OK, and said “Dive, Dive, Dive”.  The divers will quickly enter the water one after the other as the boat is moving.  Typically up to 8 divers may enter in 15 to 20 seconds.  You will then meet you dive guide on the surface and all begin your descent together.  You are usually on the surface no more than 30 seconds before beginning your descent.

And what a wonderful descent.  The islet will be on one side and you will see a gradual slope towards the bottom beneath you.  The

Scuba Diving Molokai (Steven W Smeltzer)

Fish Rain, Molokai Hawaii

depth is about 100 to 110 feet in the channel but only about 50 to 60 where you will be dropped off.  The visibility is usually very good allowing you to see 100 to 150+ feet in the distance.  There are fish everywhere.

The dive itself is basically a half-circle around Mokuhooniiki Rock and the boat will pick you up on the other side.  Dive time is usually about 50 minutes give or take depending on depth of the dive and your air consumption.  If you dive Nitrox, this is a great spot to use it as you can get a little more time at depth when looking for the Hammerheads.  I usually hang out to the left of the group as I don’t want to have a lot of other divers close to me when I am trying to get a shot.

The Hammerheads sharks are a bit skittish.  If you or someone in your group swims rapidly towards them, they will simply move away.  The key is to go slow and easy and be patient.  As you start your descent from the boat you will follow the slope down to around 50 feet and then do one of two things.  Either start swimming out into the blue and looking for the sharks, which we do many times on the first dive, or you will begin to swim around the islet.

There can be a bit of current here but usually it is not too bad.  Or if there is a ripping current it is usually going the direction of the dive once you pass the corner of the islet and it simply becomes a drift dive.  When Scuba Diving Molokai, you can see anything from dolphin, to Tiger Sharks (not often), to Greys, to Hammerheads, to a Monk seal.  You may also encounter a variety of rays and there have even been a few rare Humpback Whale sightings while on the dive (December to April).  The abundance of various fishes and eels will blow you away.  There are also many endemic species on this site so be attentive and take your time.

Scuba Diving Molokai (Steven W Smeltzer)

Molokai Pickup

When you surface you will stay with your dive group until the boat comes to get you.  You will need a safety sausage to go on this dive and at least one of you will inflate the sausage at the end of the dive to signal the boat.  If it is rough it is very important to stay as close together as possible while you are waiting to be picked up.  Their could be one or max two other groups in the water, so you may have to wait several minutes to be picked up.  Again be patient.

The boat will come very close to you and throw a line out to the divers.  You have to swim to the line and grab a hold and then begin to slowly move up the line towards the boat.  You will take off your fins while you are holding on the line and have those in one hand to give to one of the crew as they help you aboard.  If you have a camera as I do, then you will give them your camera first to the crew and then take off your fins. Then you will proceed towards the boat and use a ladder to board.  This can be quite intimidating if you have never done something like this, but the crew is exceptionally good at what they do.  Listen to them and do as they say and you will be fine.  Believe me this dive will be worth it.

Scuba Diving Molokai (Steven W Smeltzer)

Maui Flame

After you finish your first dive and complete your surface interval, you will basically repeat the same dive on your second dive.  But there is enough on this dive site to interest you no matter how many times you dive it.

After scuba diving Molokai you get to relax on the boat ride back to Lahaina and enjoy the other adventures that Maui has to offer.

Long may the Fish Rain…..the pool is open

 

 

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The San Gabriel Fine Arts Association is hosting an exhibit titled Marine / Aquatic Exhibition from April 14 to May 23.  The exhibit includes artwork that reflects a myriad of images and themes in the Marine/Aquatic environment including, Oceanic Scenery, Sea Animals, People at Sea, Marine Vessels and the Marine ecosystem.

I will have several aluminum prints on display including:

Hammerhead-Shark-Molokai

Star of India

Star-of-India-Rigging-373x563

Star of India

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Predator – Hammerhead shark, Molokai Hawaii

Hammerhead-Shark-Molokai

Predator – Hammerhead Shark

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carthaginian II

Vintage Carthaginian II

Carthaginian II

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

USS Kittiwake

USS Kittiwake at rest Grand Cayman

USS Kittiwake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Manta Ray Trio

Manta-Ray-Trio Kona Hawaii

Manta Ray Trio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The San Gabriel Fine Arts Association  (SGFAA) is a non-profit organization, founded in 1965 for the purpose of promoting traditional fine art in the community and to provide a venue for member artists to show their work. The association maintains a large group of over 200 members and represents all of Southern California and several states.

The SSGFAA supports awareness and education in the arts from aspiring artists to professionals by providing a venue and platform for members to display their works, providing art classes and art demonstrations, and encouraging growth and exploration in various forms of art to our community.

In addition to my work their will be a number of other artists displaying a variety of photographs, paintings and other work.  I would encourage everyone to go out and support the San Gabriel Fine Arts Association and their ongoing efforts at education and awareness of the arts in southern California.

The venue is at 320 Mission Deive, San Gabriel, CA the next door to the San Gabriel Playhouse and near the historic San Gabriel Mission and provides great ambience for the exhibit.

Come support the local arts community and enjoy historic San Gabriel.

Mahalo

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From December to late April and even early May is the time of the Humpback Whales in Hawaii.  We were excited to be back on Maui, it is definitely one of our favorite places on the planet.

Humpback Whales Welcome

What a wonderful start to the always magical island of Maui, Hawaii.  We arrived in Maui around noon after a very pleasant flight from Los Angeles.  We left the Kahului airport heading south on the Kuihelani Highway heading to our destination in Kaanapali.  Just as we got to the furthest point south at a “scenic lookout” from the bluffs looking toward the island of Lanai,  we saw a Kohola (Humpback  whale) do a full breach in the distance.

Humpback Whales, Maui Hawaii (Steven W Smeltzer)

Breaching Humpback Whale, Maui Hawaii

We pulled over to the lookout and watched 6 to 10 of these wonderful creatures playing in the waters between Maui, Lanai and Kaho’Olawe.

What a wonderful welcome to the island. We are looking forward to numerous whale-watching excursions and lots of scuba diving – chasing after Hammerhead sharks and other marine life.  But this time of year is always about the Humpback Whales.  They are some of natures truly most inspiring animals.

When we arrived in Ka’anapali, we started getting settled into the room, which faces the islands of Lanai and Molokai, and I had my camera out, as always, just taking in the sights when I saw another whale breach offshore.   A whale breached several times, photo above, making our welcome to the islands complete. The Humpback Whales had bid us a very wonderful welcome and I am looking forward to some extraordinary adventures over the next several weeks.  If you have not been to Hawaii during the season to see the Humpback Whales I would highly encourage you to come.  It is certainly a once in a life-time adventure.  I am both blessed and lucky that I get to do it almost every year.

Time for a great dinner and a little relaxation.

Mahalo nui loa to the great Kohola.

The pool is open….

 

 

 

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Green Sea Turtle, Mala Pier, Chelonia mydas, Maui HawaiiWe began a two week look at Maui, Lanai and Molokai reefs with a visit to Turtle Reef on Maui which is located outside and to the south of the harbor in Lahaina.  The name of this reef actually refers to a general area of reef on the western side of Maui from just past the harbor in Lahaina to Ukumehama Beach State Park (also know as Thousand Peaks).  This large area of reef has many dive spots and is relatively shallow with most of the dive under 35 to 40 feet.  This is a great spot for chilling and the reef is in very good conditions in most areas.   This site is popular for refresher dives and for completing the basic dives required for scuba certification.

The site can be a bit cloudy if the seas are choppy or you have a large swell, but for the most part visibility is reasonable and it is a good place to see a wide variety of Hawaiian marine life.  This site can be accessed from boat or shore.  The trip fro the harbor is just about 10 minutes so an easy ride and a great way to spend an afternoon.

Up later in the week are dives on Molokini Crater, Lanai, other areas of Maui and Molokai (looking for those Hammerheads).

The pool is open…

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If you are heading to the islands this year for some fun in the sun and places to dive there are several great spots to consider.    There are a number of top Hawaiian Dive sites to visit and some of my favorite spots are on Lanai, Molokai, Maui and the Big Island of Hawaii.

Scuba Diving Fish Rain, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W SMeltzer)

If you are an advanced /experienced diver definitely head for Molokai and Fish Rain.  This is the place for Hammerheads and a beautiful pinnacle that literally “rains” fish as you look for the elusive Hammerhead sharks.

On Maui, there are several good places but two of my Mala Pier, Wide Angel, Ambient Light, Maui Hawaii (Steven W Smeltzer)favorites are Molokini Crater and Mala Pier.  You can dive Mala Pier as either a boat dive or a shore dive and it is really a great night dive and one of my favorite spots in Hawaii.  Easy entry (off the boat ramp) and usually great visibility, always sharks and turtles and great for ambient light photography.

Manta Ray in Flight, Manta birostris,  (Walbaum, 1792), Kona Hawaii (Steven W Smeltzer)On the Big Island you have to do the Manta Dive.  Check out the phases of the moon (seriously) before you head out as it seems that the Mantas can be seen more in the waxing and waning phases of the moon.  You can also check on daily sitings and help determine when it is your best chance at seeing the most Manta Rays.

For information on other dive sites go to my Hawaii Dive Sites page.. and visit my website for images of fish from around the world and reviews of other great dive sites.

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Hawaii has some of the best scuba diving in the world.  From large pelagic species to lava tubes, hard corals, nudibranchs to a wide variety of endemic species. Dive sites here differ greatly from those in warmer, more temperate environments, but that does not mean they are any less spectacular.  In fact, one of my favorite dive sites on the planet is on the north eastern end of Molokai.  This dive site, know as Fish Rain, is on Moku Ho’oniki rock and in the Pailolo channel.  It is famous as a Hammerhead dive, but the reef here is amazing which some of the richest biodiversity anywhere in Hawaii or for that matter in the world.Hawaiian Dive Site Reviews, Fish Rain. Molokai Hawaii

The article provides Hawaiian Dive Site Reviews of selected scuba diving sites from a variety of the Hawaiian islands. Each review provides an overview of the dive site, a look at what you will expect to find, including photographs taken on the sites.  The reviews also provide a rating covering several aspects of the dive including:

  1. Access
  2. Depth
  3. Visibility
  4. Current
  5. Marine Species Variety
  6. Reef Health
  7. Pelagic species
  8. Wreck dive

Click on any of the sites below to read the complete review or go to Hawaii Dive Site Listings for the complete list of dive sites in Hawaii.  See Dive Site Reviews for information on ratings.

Scale:

Rating Poor Below Average Average to Good Good to Very Good Excellent
Scale 0 to 1.0 1.01 to 2 2.01 to 3 3.01 to 4 4+

 

Hawaiian Dive Site Reviews

Hawaii

Dive Site Rating
Garden Eel Cove 3.50
Golden Arches 2.74
Lone Tree Arch 3.27
Manta Ray Dive 4.13
Sukem Up Cavern 3.27

Lanai

Dive Site Rating
First Cathedrals 3.31
Sergeant Major 3.19

Maui

Dive Site Rating
Black Rock 2.84
Carthaginian II 3.14
Five Caves 2.56
Mala Pier 3.59
Molokini Crater 3.69

Molokai

Dive Site Rating
Fish Rain 4.63
xxx

If you are interested in other dive sites please check out:

Grand Cayman Dive Site Reviews

I will also be putting up other reviews for dive sites in Indonesia and Malaysia shortly.  Also be sure to let me know what your favorite dive sites are and as always, the pool is open….

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I have had some local dive instructors tell me that this is one of their favorite sites.  While, I do enjoy the Gail’s Mountain and have been diving here a number of times but I would not rank it at the top end of the other north wall dive sites.

 Gail's Mountain, Grand Cayman (StevenWSmeltzer.com)

Trumpetfish, Aulostomus maculatus, and Gorgonian Sea Fan Grand Cayman

As the name implies, Gail’s Mountain, has a point or pinnacle at the edge of the wall “Gail’s Mountain” that you can explore as either a deep dive or a second dive.

Gail’s Mountain is located close to the cut in the reef on the north wall and the visibility after heavy or constant rains can be a bit challenging compared to dive sites closer to Rum Point.  When it rains steadily for extended periods and/or heavily there tends to be a lot of run-off from the Mangroves inside the North Sound which has a very high amount of particulates.  This will make the water quite cloudy on the sites that are close to the cuts in the reef.

I actually prefer the site as a second dive assuming I have been able to get to one of the sites such Andes Wall. The diversity of marine life on the site is quite good and I have on several occasions seen Spotted Eagle Rays and even the rare Hammerhead Shark.

Gail’s Mountain Rating: 3.36 out of 5

  • Visibility – Good to very good; note visibility can be moderate to minimal here after a heavy rain
  • Access – Moderate; boat only and about 30 to 40 minutes from Safe Haven harbor (Note it can be fairly rough on the North Wall and regularly has low swells so take precautions if you tend to get seasick)
  • Current – Variable, moderate to strong most of time
  • Depth to 100 ft / 30 m
  • Reef health Hard / Soft Corals – Good
  • Sponges / Plants – Good
  • Marine species variety – Good
  • Pelagics / Mammals / Turtles / Rays – minimal typically 1 to 3 sightings on a dive
Gail's Mountain, Grand Cayman (StevenWSmeltzer.com)

Striped Parrotfish, Scarus iseri, Grand Cayman

Gail's Mountain, Grand Cayman (StevenWSmeltzer.com)

Slimy Sea Plume, Pseudopterogorgia americana, Grand Cayman

When diving Gail’s Mountain as a top of the wall dive make sure to take your time exploring the many hard and soft corals and sponges.  There is a good variety from the orange Elephant Ear sponges to a variety of beautiful vase sponges and barrel sponges, a couple or really nice Grooved Brain Coral and some very nice Gorgonian Fans,  including one on top of the pinnacle.  You will also find a good variety of fishes on site including the gorgeous Queen Angelfish, Nassau Groupers, Green Morays, Fairy Basslets, Bluestriped Grunt and many more.

Gail's Mountain, Grand Cayman (StevenWSmeltzer.com)

Flamingo Tongue, Cyphoma Gibbosum, Grand Cayman

A north wall dive on almost any of the available sites is hard to beat. On good days the visibility can be well over 150 feet and the water colored a wonderful aqua blue. When diving Gail’s Mountain as a top of the wall dive it is usually a buddy dive with depth limits of around 60 feet for 50 to 60 minutes depending upon your nitrogen levels from your previous dives.  Make sure to spend at least some of the time at the edge of the wall and look down and out as you may be able to get a glimpse of one of the many pelagic species that can be found on Grand Cayman.

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Golden Arches, Kona Hawaii (Steven W Smeltzer)Golden Arches is another typical scuba diving site on the Kona side of the Island. There are lots of stony corals in healthy condition and a reasonable variety of marine life.  Visibility will vary on the site depending upon how close you are diving to the surge zone and the strength and direction of the currents.

 

Golden Arches Rating: 2.74 out of 5

  • Visibility – moderate to good, but highly variable
  • Access – Moderate; boat only and 25 minutes from Honokohau Marina & Small Boat Harbor, Kailua Kona
  • Current – variable, minimal to strong; surge can be quite strong closer to the shallow reef
  • Depth to 60 ft / 18 m
  • Reef health Hard / Soft Corals – Good
  • Marine species variety – Good
  • Pelagics / Mammals / Turtles / Rays – no sightings on the dive

So far the week had been great with lots of sun, not too much surge, good visibility and we had 17 Manta Rays on our prior afternoon dive and 37 Manta Rays on our night dive the previous evening.   Something had to give….

There was a strong south west to north east swell running and a storm was going to be coming in over the next couple of days so I knew we were cutting it close.  We left the Honokohau Marina & Small Boat Harbor, Kailua Kona on schedule and I was hoping we could get our diving in before the weather ran us out. I had been diving off Molokai the previous week looking for Hammerhead sharks with 10 to 12 foot seas and higher swells, so I was not concerned but I was hoping for at least reasonable conditions for some last photos before we left the island.

We went north out of the harbor and the swells were running fairly strong and we tried looking at several spotsGolden Arches, Kona Hawaii (Steven W Smeltzer) before dropping anchor at off Golden Arches.  We had notice several boats that passed us heading further north but before we got in the water they were heading back to our area to find a reasonable spot to get wet.

I was diving with Big Island Divers out of Kona and they have very good crews but the boats are not large.  The divers on board were mostly lesser experienced divers and all were looking forward to a great morning dive.   We got off the boat fine and into the water.  Because it was fairly rough a couple of people decided not to get join us and just road out our dive on the boat.

Golden Arches, Kona Hawaii (Steven W Smeltzer)

Golden Arches Overview

We actually had reasonable conditions and I was able to get in a few good shots by the end of the dive.  In fact I had been talking to someone on the boat about the rather  uncommon “black” form of the Common Longnose Butterflyfish and got a reasonable shot of this fellow in the first few minutes of the dive.  I also was able to get a shot of the extremely rare Whitley’s Boxfish on this dive.  It just shows that you need to pay attention when you dive and watch your surroundings closely.  There are many amazing fish in Hawaii and you can miss them easily if you are not paying attention.  When we started getting back on the boat the weather was not cooperating and the swells had grown considerably.  We tried a couple of locations nearby but the weather and sea were not going to cooperate.  I did not complain, the dive on Golden Arches was quite nice and I had 20 great dives Golden Arches, Kona Hawaii (Steven W Smeltzer)over a 10 day period and also got to relax a good bit on Maui and the big island.

You should remember that when the boat captain says that a dive should not be made, don’t get angry with him or her, they are trying to keep you safe.  Be appreciative of their skills and care because they had much rather you be diving than complaining.  As a diver there is always another day, be safe, enjoy the moment and the relax.

View other underwater photography images on my website or view other dive site reviews and photos on my blog or follow me on Twitter @ images2inspire. The pool is open…

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Chinese Wall Grand Cayman can be done as a first / deep dive on the wall or as a shallow / second dive.  Chinese Wall Grand Cayman (StevenWSmeltzer.com)This site is a better wall dive, but diving as a second dive is usually ok, but it can be a bit “cloudy” if there have been recent / continual rains.
It is located fairly close to one of the cuts in the coral reef near Stingray City in the North Sound and can get a good bit of “run-off” from the mangroves after a rain. The boat captain should check the visibility on Chinese Wall Grand Cayman before the dive so this will usually not be too much of a problem. However, if it has been raining a good bit I would be sure and suggest another site if you have the opportunity. Typically go to the sites towards Rumpoint and beyond if possible as they will tend to be out of the “run-off” area.

Chinese Wall Grand Cayman Rating: 3.06 out of 5

  • Visibility – moderate although sometimes can be very good
  • Access – Easy, boat only and about 45 minutes from Safe Haven harbor (Note it can be fairly rough on the North Wall and regularly has low swells so take precautions if you tend to get seasick)
  • Current – moderate 
  • Depth to 95 ft / 33 m
  • Reef health Hard / Soft Corals – Good
  • Sponges / Plants – Moderate to good
  • Marine species variety – Good
  • Pelagics / Mammals / Turtles / Rays – minimal typically 1 to 3 sightings on a dive
Chinese Wall Grand Cayman (StevenWSmeltzer.com)

Knobby Cactus Coral, Mycetophyllia aliciae, Grand Cayman

Chinese Wall Grand Cayman is typical for dive sites on the north wall. As a deep dive you will head down close to the buoy and then swim as a group down towards the wall. You will descend through a channel in the coral reef and exit at about 100 ft on the wall. Then you will swim along the wall for a few minutes and gradually make your way back to the top of the wall. Scuba divers will sometimes be treated to a Spotted Eagle Ray or even more rarely a Hammerhead Shark as you swim along the wall.

Chinese Wall Grand Cayman (StevenWSmeltzer.com)

Blue Chromis, and Yellowhead Wrasse, Grand Cayman

You will often find sea turtles on the site and as with all north wall sites there is a good variety and number of fish on the site. Also due to its proximity to Stingray City you can often find Stingrays cruising at the top of the wall or resting in one of the sand channels on top of the wall.

Chinese Wall Grand Cayman (StevenWSmeltzer.com)

Spotlight Parrotfish Initial Phase, Sparisoma viride, Grand Cayman

Chinese Wall Grand Cayman has a good variety of hard and soft corals on the site although the sites from Rum Point and past tend to have much better soft corals.  The varieties of coral range from Knobby Cactus Corals to the Slimy Sea Plumes to encrusting Lettuce Coral and much more. You will also typically find a number of Moray Eels on this site along with Princess Parottfish, Black Durgon, Blue Chromis, Yellowhead Wrasse and a variety of other fish. You can also find Spiny Lobsters and a variety of other crustaceans if you take your time on the dive.

If I am scuba diving this site as a deep dive, after enjoying the wall, I will usually take one section or area near the buoy and examine it very carefully for small creatures. It is usually time well spent. See my dive site reviews for information on other Grand Cayman scuba diving sites.

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Leslie’s Curl is another good dive site on the north wall just outside the north sound.  This dive site is in the same vicinity as Chinese Wall, No Name Wall and Hammerhead Hill.

Leslie's Curl, Grand Cayman (StevenWSmeltzer.com)

Nassau Grouper, Epinephelus striatus, Grand Cayman

Leslie’s Curl is generally a very good dive site unless there has been a substantial amount of rain.  The site can get a lot of silt in the water cutting visibility substantially due to rain.

If it has been raining a good bit or if the sound is a very green color as you head out you may want to suggest a different site to the captain.  However, even on a day when visibility is not “good” by Grand Cayman standards, you still get 50+ feet of visibility.  Leslie’s Curl is named from a reef crest that seems to “curl” over the north wall.  The site also has a nice swim through and a very good reef on top of the wall.  As with all the dive sites on the north wall you have the wonderful deep blue view as you look down into the 6,000 foot deep trench that makes Grand Cayman’s north wall dives so amazing.

Leslie’s Curl Rating: 3.32 out of 5

  • Visibility – moderate although sometimes can be very good
  • Access – Moderate, boat only and about 45 minutes from Safe Haven harbor (Note it can be fairly rough on the North Wall and regularly has low swells so take precautions if you tend to get seasick)
  • Current – Variable, minimal to strong 
  • Depth to 100 ft / 30 m
  • Reef health Hard / Soft Corals – Moderate
  • Sponges / Plants – Good
  • Marine species variety – Good
  • Pelagics / Mammals / Turtles / Rays – minimal typically 1 to 3 sightings on a dive
Leslie's Curl, Grand Cayman (StevenWSmeltzer.com)

Blue Chromis, Chromis cyanea, Grand Cayman

When you dive Leslie’s Curl, as with most sites on the North Wall, you will descend to about 50 feet and then begin to make your way out to the wall.  Being on the “Wall” is always one of my favorite

Leslie's Curl, Grand Cayman (StevenWSmeltzer.com)

Green Moray Eel, Gymnothorax funebris, Grand Cayman

activities.  When it is extremely clear you can see 200+feet down until everything fades into a deep blue.  If you turn away from the wall and look out into the ocean it is as close to a feeling of being in space that most of us will encounter.  Also keep your eyes looking about as you may seen Spotted Eagle Rays or even sharks on this site.

Leslie's Curl, Grand Cayman (StevenWSmeltzer.com)

Pink Vase Sponge, Niphates digitalis, Grand Cayman

The top of the wall has a variety of soft and hard corals where you will be able to find Moray Eels, Spiny

Lobsters, as well as other crustaceans.  You will also find a wide variety of fishes such as Nassau Grouper, French and Grey Angelfishes, Black Durgons, Blue Tangs, Cocoa Damselfish and many more.  There are also sand chutes on the site leading down to the wall where you may find Southern Stingrays.

The site has a lot to offer and should make a great dive.

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Fish Rain

Fish Rain is a great site and probably has one of the highest densities of marine species that you will find while scuba diving in Maui County. Scuba diving at Molokai would rate even higher if it were easier to access. Scuba diving Molokai is challenging, this is not a dive for the novice. In fact any time you haveScuba Diving Fish Rain, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W SMeltzer) to cross the Pailolo Channel you are in for an interesting ride. Seas can regularly be between 6 and 10 feet with strong gust or steady winds. The Pailolo Channel is one of the windiest and roughest of the Hawaiian Island channels. Seas of 4 to 6 feet should be considered calm water and it takes about 45 minutes to get to the dive site. So do not attempt this dive unless you do not have a problem with motion sickness, you are not intimidated by rough seas, and you are not concerned about exiting or reentering the boat while it is moving. But….what a great dive.

Fish Rain Overall Rating = 4.1 out of 5

  • Access – Difficult to reach the site; Complex entry and exit; Advanced level only
  • Depth to 120ft
  • Visibility – very good to excellent
  • Current – variable – moderate to quite strong
  • Marine Species variety – Wonderful diversity and high number of species; large pelagic species
  • Reef health – Very good

Rebreather, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W SMeltzer)There are no buoys on the north east side of Molokai, no place for a boat to tie up and the high seas mean the boats must stay in constant motion when dropping or picking up divers. There will be rigid instructions given for entry and reentry into the boat and these must be followed. The dive masters and captains regularly take ginger before making this trip. So again, this trip is not for novice divers.
Now….to the good stuff….
Scuba Diving Molokai, including Fish Rain, is a really cool scuba diving site and one of my favorite anywhere on the planet. It is on the far eastern side of Molokai at Pennant Butterflyfish, Heniochus diphreutes, Jordan, 1903, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W SMeltzer)Mokuhooniki Rock. You go to this site for Hammerheads and you get the bonus of amazing diversity and quantity of marine life. The site depth is to about 110 feet around the pinnacle/Mokuhooniki Rock and there are sea grass beds along the bottom. You will a good amount of coral on the lava slopes of the pinnacle and such a great variety of fish surrounding that will make you think it is literally “raining” fish, hence the name of this site. If Milletseed Butterflyfish, Chaetodon miliaris, Quoy & Gaimard, 1824, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W SMeltzer)the weather is good and there is adequate sunlight Fish Rain makes a really terrific place for underwater photography and the opportunity to see large pelagic species. If you do not encounter sharks or other pelagic species, do not worry this dive site will not disappoint.
You will need to exit the boat as it is moving. The seas are typically 2 to 4 feet as you enter the water. You will be given precise instructions on how to get into a ready position for entry into the water and you need to follow these closely. You will typically gear up and wait at your station until signaled by your dive master. You will then queue up in groups and when the dive master says “Dive, Dive, Dive” you enter the water, whith your camera or other gear and swim quickly away from the boat as all divers in your Starfish, Linckia multifora, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W SMeltzer)group will be entering one right after the other. Your inner “navy seal” will love this. So enjoy.
Once in the water you will descend as a group quickly as you do not want to stay on the surface here for an extended period of time. As you descend you will notice immediately the large number of fish surrounding you and the pinnacle. You will see hundreds of fish and seeming including various Blackside Hawkfish, Paracirrhites forsteri, (Bloch & Schneider, 1801), Molokai Hawaii (Steven W SMeltzer)Butterflyfishes such as the Pennant Butterflyfish and Milletseed Butterflyfish all around hence  the name Fish Rain. You will also see Eels, Unicornfishes, all types of Wrasses and much more. A camera of some type is a must for this location if you can. The lava pinnacle has lots of very healthy hard corals covering the slope down to the sea floor which tends to be covered in sea grass. You will more than likely go to around 100 to 115 feet just off the pinnacle on your first dive and “hang out” waiting to for the Hammerhead sharks. You will more than likely at least get a view of the sharks in the distance and if you are patient and do not frighten them away they may come in to investigate your dive group. The Hammerheads are easily frightened or chased away so do not chase them as soon as you see them. Be patient and wait for them to approach your group, they are basically curious and you may be rewarded to see them up close.
Fish Rain is more or less a drift dive and you will follow your instructor and then surface and wait for Shortnose Wrasse, Macropharyngodon geoffroy, (Quoy & Gaimard, 1824), and Yellowtail Coris, Coris gaimard, (Quoy & Gaimard, 1824), Molokai Hawaii (Steven W SMeltzer)the boat to come and pick you up. You must have a safety sausage or signaling device when on this dive. It is extremely difficult to see a diver in calm waters from a distance and in these seas without a signaling device you can easily be missed. When you surface, have one or more of the people in your group inflate their safety sausage and then wait until the ship spots you. You could be on the surface for 15 minutes before you are picked up, especially if you have more than one group in the water. The boat will typically have a line in the water and all divers will need to use the rope for reentry to the boat. As the boat comes by simply grab and hold onto the line and then wait your turn to approach and enter the boat. Be prepared and be patient. This is certainly one of my favorite scuba diving sites and highly recommended to very experienced divers.

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Fish Rain, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W Smeltzer)

Fish Rain, Molokai Hawaii

Fish Rain is a great dive site and probably has one of the highest densities of marine species that you will find while scuba diving in Maui County.  This site would rate even higher if it were easier to access. Scuba diving in Moloki is challenging, this is not a dive for the novice.  In fact any time you have to cross the Pailolo Channel you are in for an interesting ride.  Seas can regularly be between 6 and 10 feet with strong gust or steady winds.  The Pailolo Channel is one of the windiest and roughest of the Hawaiian Island channels.  Seas of 4 to 6 feet

Fish Rain, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W Smeltzer)

Awesome visibility

should be considered calm water and it takes about 45 minutes to get to the dive site.  Do not attempt this dive unless you do not have a problem with motion sickness, you are not intimidated by rough seas, and you are not concerned about exiting or reentering the boat while it is moving.  But….what a great dive.  In fact this is one of my favorite dives on the planet.

Fish Rain, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W Smeltzer)

Rebreather diving on Fish Rain

There are no buoys on the north east side of Molokai, no place for a boat to tie up and the usually choppy to rough surface conditions mean the boats must stay in constant motion when dropping or picking up divers.  There will be rigid instructions given for entry and reentry into the boat and these must be followed.  The dive masters and captains regularly take ginger before making this trip.  So again, Fish Rain is not for novice divers.
Now….to the good stuff….

Fish Rain Rating = 4.63out of 5

  • Visibility – Very good to excellent; typically the best visibility in Maui County
  • Access – Difficult to reach the site; 45 to 60 minutes from Lahaina Harbor; Complex entry and exit; Advanced level only
  • Current – variable – moderate to quite strong
  • Depth to 120 ft / 36 m
  • Reef health Hard / Soft Corals – Excellent, wonderful corals all around Mokuhooniki Rock
  • Marine species variety – Excellent, Wonderful diversity and high number of species;
  • Pelagics / Mammals / Turtles / Rays – Sharks, sharks, sharks many dives with 10+ Hammerheads, White reef tips, occasional Tiger Shark, Monk Seals, and much more…..AWESOME

Fish Rain Overview

Fish Rain, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W Smeltzer)

Milletseed Butterflyfish. Chaetodon miliaris. Molokai Hawaii

Fish Rain is a really awesome scuba diving site.  It is on the far eastern side of Molokai near Mokuhooniki Rock.  You go to this site for Hammerheads and you get the bonus of amazing diversity and quantity of marine life.  The site depth is to about 110 – 120 feet, 36 meters around the pinnacle/Mokuhooniki Rock.  There are sea grass beds along the

Fish Rain, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W Smeltzer)

Pennant Butterflyfish, Heniochus diphreutes, Molokai Hawaii

bottom between Mokuhooniki Rock and the island of Molokai and this is where you will often find the Hammerheads swimming.  You will see a wide variety of hard coral on the lava slopes of the pinnacle and such a great variety of fish surrounding  that will make you think it is literally “raining” fish, hence the name of this site.

Fish Rain, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W Smeltzer)

Blackside Hawkfish. Paracirrhites forsteri. Molokai Hawaii

If the weather is good and there is adequate sunlight this site makes a really nice place for underwater photography and the opportunity to see large pelagic species.  If you do not encounter sharks or other pelagic species, do not worry this Fish Rain will not disappoint.
You will need to exit the boat as it is moving.  The seas are typically 2 to 4 feet as you enter the water.  You will be given precise instructions on how to get into a ready position for entry into the water and you need to follow these closely.  You will typically gear up and wait at your station until signaled by your dive master.  You will then queue up in groups and when the dive master says “Dive, Dive, Dive” you enter the water, with your camera or other gear and swim quickly away from the boat as all divers in your group will be entering one right after the other.  Your inner “navy seal” will love this.  So enjoy.
Once in the water you will descend as a group quickly as you do not want to stay on the surface here for an extended period of time.  As you descend you will notice immediately the large number of fish surrounding you and the pinnacle.  You will see hundreds of fish including various Butterflyfishes such as the Pennant Butterflyfish and Milletseed Butterflyfish.  You will also see Eels, Unicornfishes, all types of Wrasses and much more.  A camera of some type is a must for this location if you can.  The lava p

Fish Rain, Molokai Hawaii (Steven W Smeltzer)

Starfish. Linckia multifora. Molokai Hawaii

innacle has lots of very healthy hard corals covering the slope down to the sea floor which tends to be covered in sea grass.  You will more than likely go to around 40 to 60 feet (12 to 18 meters) just off the pinnacle on your first dive and “hang out” waiting to for the Hammerhead sharks.  The sharks can be anywhere in the water column so make sure your head is on a swivel.  You will more than likely at least get a view of the sharks in the distance and if you are patient and do not frighten them away they may come in to investigate your dive group.   The Hammerheads are easily frightened or chased away so do not chase them as soon as you see them.  Be patient and wait for them to approach your group, they are basically curious and you may b

Shortnose Wrasse, Macropharyngodon geoffroy, (Quoy & Gaimard, 1824), and Yellowtail Coris, Coris gaimard, (Quoy & Gaimard, 1824), Molokai Hawaii (Steven W SMeltzer)

Shortnose Wrasse. Yellowtail Coris. Molokai Hawaii

e rewarded to see them up close.  I usually carry a little bit of extra weight on this dive to enable me to descend quickly if I see Hammerheads at depth.
Fish Rain is more or less a drift dive and you will follow your instructor and then surface and wait for the boat to come and pick you up.  You must have a safety sausage or signaling device when on this dive.  It is extremely difficult to see a diver in calm waters from a distance and in these seas without a signaling device you can easily be missed.  When you surface, have one or more of the people in your group inflate their safety sausage and then wait until the ship spots you.  You could be on the surface for 15 minutes before you are picked up, especially if you have more than one group in the water.  The boat will typically have a line in the water and all divers will need to use the rope for reentry to the boat.  As the boat comes by simply grab and hold onto the line and then wait your turn to approach and enter the boat.  Be prepared and be patient.  This is certainly one of my favorite scuba diving sites and highly recommended to very experienced divers.

As in all dives I recommend going slowly and take time to appreciate the site. Read other dive site reviews on my blog and see other underwater photographs on my website and follow me on Twitter @ images2inspire. The pool is open…

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Andes Wall Grand Cayman

Andes Wall, Scuba Diving, Grand Cayman (Steven W Smeltzer)

Scuba Diving, Grand Cayman, Andes Wall

 

When you are on your next trip to Grand Cayman make a point to scuba dive on Andes Wall, you will certainly not regret it. It is certainly one of my favorite sites on the island and is accessible from the West Side dive boat operators or out of Rum Point.

Andes Wall, Scuba Diving, Grand Cayman (Steven W Smeltzer)

Calm day on the north side

Andes Wall is a great wall dive and is a premium spot for underwater photography. The dive site is located just past Rum Point on the North Wall. Typical conditions are 100+ feet of visibility and has a sheer drop along the wall of several thousand feet. On this dive you will see Spotted Eagle Rays on almost every dive. There are also other pelagics species that can be found here from the elusive Tiger Shark to White Tips, Hammerheads and more.

 

Andes Wall Rating: 3.75 out of 5

  • Visibility – Good to excellent
  • Access – Moderate; boat only and about 45 minutes from Safe Haven harbor (Note it can be fairly rough on the North Wall and regularly has low swells so take precautions if you tend to get seasick)
  • Current – Variable moderate to strong most of time
  • Depth to 100 ft / 30 m
  • Reef health Hard / Soft Corals – Good
  • Sponges / Plants – Good
  • Marine species variety – Good
  • Pelagics / Mammals / Turtles / Rays – minimal typically 1 to 3 sightings on a dive;
Andes Wall, Spotted Eagle Ray, Grand Cayman

Andes Wall, Spotted Eagle Ray, Grand Cayman

I went with Red Sail Sports on my last dive at Andes Wall and the day was absolutely perfect for underwater photography. It was one of those extremely rare days when the north wall was absolutely flat. The visibility was over 150, no current, very little particulates in the water and there were only 8 divers on the boat. This must be paradise.  Andes Wall Grand Cayman is just about 10 to 15 minutes past Rum Point on the North Side and one of my two favorite dive sites on the North Wall.

Andes Wall, Spotted Eagle Ray, Grand Cayman

Spotted Eagle Ray, Aetobatus narinari, (Euphrasen, 1790), Grand Cayman

You can Andes Wall on top of the wall or as a wall dive and I would highly recommend the wall dive. When we descended to the mooring the first thing I noticed on this dive was a Spotted Eagle Ray in the distance and a Great Barracuda cruising by. This was one of seven that I saw on this dive. After meeting at the mooring pin, we head to the wall notch, the visibility is absolutely phenomenal. We then made our way through the “notch” to the wall and

Andes Wall, Grand Cayman (Steven W Smeltzer)

Blackcap Basslet, Scuba Diving, Grand Cayman

immediately on my left was another Spotted Eagle Ray. This is going to be a great dive.

As we move past the 90 foot level out to the wall I notice a number of Blackcap Basslets swimming upside down in a small indentation in the wall. There are a great variety of fish usually on this dive. Today we see Schoolmasters, numerous types of Basslets, Princess Parrotfish, Bermuda Chub, Blue Chromis, Trumpetfish, Gray Angelfish, Spiny Lobsters, Spotted Eagle Rays and much, much more. The soft corals are

Andes Wall, Grand Cayman (Steven W Smeltzer)

Green Moray Eel, Scuba Diving, Grand Cayman

amazing on this part of the island and they are especially plentiful around the mooring ball on this dive. You will find several great places to get photos of sea fans, or sea rods, sea whips and of course many colorful stony corals as well.

Andes Wall, Grand Cayman (Steven W Smeltzer)

Spotted Eagle Ray, Sunball, Scuba Diving, Grand Cayman

Andes Wall Grand Cayman will definitely not disappoint.  I got one of my better shots of the trip as I was setting up to take a shot of a Giant Slit-Pore Sea Rod.  I was looking up towards the sun to frame the soft coral I noticed one of the Spotted Eagle Rays that had been following us throughout the dive and repositioned slightly and the rest…well I will leave it up to the photo to speak for itself. Needless to say I think I found a great image….

Andes Wall, Grand Cayman (Steven W Smeltzer)

Spiny Lobster, Scuba Diving, Grand Cayman

This place is magic and as a scuba diver this is a must dive when you come to Grand Cayman and if you are an underwater photographer, perhaps you can make a little magic of your own.

The pool is open…..

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When you are on your next scuba diving trip to Grand Cayman make a point to get to Andes Wall. It is certainly one of my favorite sites on the island and is accessible from the West Side dive boat operators or out of Rum Point.   Andes Wall Grand Cayman is a great wall dive and is a premium spot for underwater photography.

Andes Wall Grand Cayman (Steven W Smeltzer)

Andes Wall, Grand Cayman

Andes Wall Grand Cayman (Steven W Smeltzer)

Grand Cayman past Rum Point, Looking from the mooring ball at Andes Wall

Andes Wall Grand Cayman is located just past Rum Point on the North Wall.  Typical conditions are 100+ feet of visibility and has a sheer drop along the wall of several thousand feet.

On this dive you will see Spotted Eagle Rays on almost every dive.  There are also other pelagics that can be found here from the elusive Tiger Shark to White Tips, Hammerheads and more.

Andes Wall Grand Cayman (Steven W Smeltzer)

Spotted Eagle Ray, Aetobatus narinari, Grand Cayman

I went with Red Sail Sports on my last dive at Andes Wall and the day was absolutely perfect for underwater photography.  It was one of those extremely rare days when the north wall was absolutely flat.  The visibility was over 150, no current, very little particulates in the water and there were only 8 divers on the boat.  This must be paradise. Andes Wall is just about 10 to 15 minutes past Rum Point on the North Side and one of my two favorite dive sites on the North Wall.

Andes Wall Grand Cayman (Steven W Smeltzer)

Spotted Eagle Ray, Aetobatus narinari, Grand Cayman

You can dive Andes Wall Grand Cayman as a shallow top of the wall or as a deep wall dive.  I would highly recommend the wall dive.  When we descended to the mooring  the first thing I noticed on this dive was a Spotted Eagle Ray in the distance and a Great Barracuda cruising by.    This was one of seven that I saw on this dive.  After meeting at the mooring pin, we head to the wall notch, the visibility is absolutely phenomenal.  We then made our way through the “notch” to the wall and immediately on my left was another Spotted Eagle Ray.  This is going to be a great dive.

Andes Wall Grand Cayman (Steven W Smeltzer)

Blackcap Basslet, Gramma melacara, Grand Cayman

As we move past the 90 foot level out to the wall I notice a number of Blackcap Basslets swimming upside down in a small indentation in the wall.  There are a great variety of fish usually on this dive.  Today we see Schoolmasters, numerous types of basslets, Princess Parrotfish, Bermuda Chub, Blue Chromis, Trumpetfish, Gray Angelfish, Spiny Lobsters, Spotted Eagle Rays and much, much more. The soft corals are amazing on this part of the island and they are especially plentiful around the mooring ball on this dive.  You will find several great places to get photos of sea fans, or sea rods, sea whips and of course many colorful stony corals as well.

Andes Wall Grand Cayman (Steven W Smeltzer)

Green Moray Eel, Gymnothorax funebris, Grand Cayman

Andes Wall Grand Cayman (Steven W Smeltzer)

Spotted Eagle Ray, Aetobatus narinari, Grand Cayman

Then the shot of the trip.  I was setting up to take a shot of a Giant Slit-Pore Sea Rod and looking up towards the sun to frame the soft coral  I noticed one of the Spotted Eagle Rays that had been following us throughout the dive and repositioned slightly and the rest…well I will leave it up to the photo to speak for itself.  Needless to say I think I found an image that was definitely worth waiting for….

Andes Wall Grand Cayman (Steven W Smeltzer)

Spiny Lobster, Palinuridae argus, Grand Cayman

Andes Wall Grand Cayman is magic and as a scuba diver this is a highly recommended dive if you get the chance the next time you come to Grand Cayman and if you are an underwater photographer, perhaps you can make a little magic of your own.

The pool is open…..

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Hawaiian Dive Sites Green Sea Turtle, Maui HawaiiThe table below contains a complete listing of major Hawaiian dive sites from the big island of Hawaii to Kauai and Maui as well as the other islands . There are a number of great scuba diving sites all around the Hawaiian Islands.  From the incredible Manta Ray dive off the coast of Kona to the awe inspiring Hammerhead dive off of Molokai.  You can hear Humpbacks singing underwater from December to April and you may, if you are extremely lucky, have a Humpback share part of your dive with you.

When you are considering Hawaiian Dive Sites and scheduling your trip, the most important aspect from my perspective, is your level of diving expertise and your goals for diving in Hawaii.  There are some great dives in Hawaii, but some of these are only recommended for advanced divers.  There are enough dive sites for anyone to enjoy, so just make sure to read about the sites you intend to visit and then plan accordingly.  There are some great drift dives, some amazing crazy adventure dives and then many, many dives suitable for all levels of divers that have great varieties of marine life

Remember when you are diving in Hawaii, you are diving in cooler water, so the corals will be hard corals and look very different from those of the warm Caribbean.  However, these corals and reefs are just as alive and if you take the time to explore you will find some great examples of bio-diversity and a few sites that will blow your mind.  I have also provided a rating for each of the Hawaiian dive sites where I have enough information to provide a reasonable rating.  View my dive site rating system for more information on how I have developed the ratings.

Visit Hawaiian Dive Sites for reviews and information on selected dive sites.

Location Name Depth Access Rating
Maui Hawaii 7 Pools 60ft / 18m Shore
Back Wall 130-160ft /39-48m
Boat
Baldwin Beach 60ft / 18m Shore
Big Beach 30ft / 9m Shore
Black Rock 25-30 ft / 7-9m
Shore
Carthaginian II 90ft / 27m Boat
Cemetery 20ft / 6m Shore
Coral Gardens 35ft / 11m Boat
D.T. Flemming Beach 30ft / 9m Shore
Dragon Reef 25-70 ft / 7-21m
Boat
Enenue 50-120 ft / 15-36m
Boat
F-6-F Hellcat 30 ft / 9m
Boat
Five Caves/Graves 20-50 feet Boat / Shore
Haleki’i Point 60ft / 18m Shore
Haloa Point 50ft / 15m Shore
Hana Bay 50ft / 15m Shore
Hidden Pinnacle 120 ft / 36m
Boat
Honokohau Bay 50ft / 15m Boat / Shore
Honolua Bay 35ft / 11m Boat / Shore
Hononana Bay 50ft / 15m Shore
Hyatt/Marriott Reef 50 feet Boat
Inside Crater 10-60 feet Boat
Kahakuloa Bay 70ft / 21m Shore
Kahawaihapapa Point 160ft / 49m Boat / Shore
Kahekili Beach 20ft / 6m Shore
Kamaole Beach Parks 25ft / 8m Shore
Kapalua Bay & Beach 45ft / 14m Shore
Ke’anae Peninsula 60ft / 18m Shore
La Perouse Bay 50ft / 15m Shore
Lookout 40ft / 12m Shore
Makena Beach 30ft / 9m Shore
Makule’ia Bay 40ft / 12m Shore
Mala Pier 45ft / 13m Shore
Maliko Bay 60ft / 18m Shore
Manu’ohule 50ft / 15m Shore
Marty’s Reef 60ft / 18m Boat
McGregor Point 50ft / 15m Shore
Mokolea Point 110ft / 33m Shore
Molokini Crater 110ft / 33m Boat
Nahiku 60ft / 18m Shore
Nakalele Point 150ft / 45m Boat / Shore
Napili Bay 30ft / 9m Shore
Nu’u Bay 45ft / 14m Shore
Olowalu 35ft / 11m Boat / Shore
Pauwela Point 50ft / 15m Shore
Puu Koae 100ft / 48m Boat
Reef’s End 100ft / 30m Boat
Shark Ledges 160ft / 48m Boat
The Tubes 40ft / 12m Boat
Ulua & Mokapu Beach 35ft / 11m Boat / Shore
Wai’anapanapa 50ft / 15m Shore
Wailea & Polo Beach 50ft / 15m Boat / Shore
Lanai 1st Cathedral 45-60 feet Boat
2nd Cathedral 15-65 feet Boat
Armchair Boat
Barge Harbor Boat
Fish Rock 15-70 feet Boat / Shore
Houlopo’e/Manele Bay 20-35 feet Shore
Lighthouse Reef Boat
Menpachi Caves Boat
Monolith 15-70 feet Boat
Other Boat
Pyramids 40-80 feet Boat
Sargent Major 15-50 feet Boat
Sargent Minor 15-50 feet Boat
Shark Fin 25-90 feet Boat
Turtle Haven 60ft / 18m Boat
Wash Rock 65 feet Boat
Oahu 100ft Hole 70-160 feet Boat
Black Rock / Ulua Cave 40-90 feet Boat
Blow Hole 20-60 feet Shore / Boat
Corsair Plane 107 feet Boat
Devils Rock 70 feet Boat
Dominique’s Wall 35-95 feet Boat
Electric Beach 10 – 30ft Shore
Ewa Pinnacles 50-80 feet Boat
Fantasy Reef 40-60 feet Boat / Shore
Hanauma Bay 15 -70 feet Shore
Ka’ena Point 20-45 feet Boat
Kahala Barge 80 feet Boat / Shore
Kahuku Ledge 70-160 ft Boat
Kahuna Canyon 35-100 feet Boat
Keaau Corner 35-70 feet Boat / Shore
Kewalo Pipe 40 feet Boat
Lanai Lookout 107 feet Shore
Land Of OZ 20-70 feet Boat / Shore
Makaha Caverns 30 – 45 feet Boat / Shore
Makapu’u Point 45 feet Boat / Shore
Makua Valley Ridge 33-45 feet Shore
Manana “Rabbit” Island 40-80 feet Boat / Shore
Mokolea 35-70 feet Boat / Shore
Moku Manu 90 feet Boat
Mole Heaven 60 feet Shore
Pearl Harbor Wall 5 -60 feet Boat / Shore
Police Beach 15-85 feet Boat
Rainbow Reef And Magic Island 20 – 60ft Shore
Sea Cave 40-80 feet Boat / Shore
Sea Tiger 80 – 120 feet Boat
Seaplane Wreck 90-110 feet Boat
Sharks Cove 15-60 feet Shore
Tech Reef 10 – 25 feet Shore
The Mahi 70-95 ft Boat
Three Tables 20-45ft Shore
Turtle Canyon / Koko Craters 30-40 feet Boat
Turtle Heaven 10-100 feet Boat / Shore
Turtle Street 25-30 feet Shore
Unnamed Reef 60-70 feet Boat / Shore
Waialua Wall 10-80 feet Boat / Shore
Waimea Wall 25-60 feet Boat / Shore
Y0-257 80-100 feet Boat
Molokai Fish Bowl 40-60 feet Boat
Fish Rain 100ft / 30.5m Boat
The Cove / Fish Cove 20-100 feet Boat
Hole In The Wall 20-120 feet Boat
Mokuhooniki Rock / Elephant Rock 90-100 feet Boat
Kauai Ahukini Landing 160ft / 49m Shore
Blue Bluffs 110ft / 33m Boat
Brennecke’s Ledge 50ft / 15m Boat
Dragon’s Head 45ft / 14m Boat
Fast Lanes 50ft / 15m Boat
Fishbowl 80ft / 8m Boat
General Store 35ft / 11m Boat
Icebox 55ft / 17m Boat
Ke’e Lagoon 80ft / 24m Shore
Keyhole 60ft / 18m Boat
Lehua Gardens 50ft / 15m Boat
Luckenbach 60ft / 18m Shore
Mana Crack 95ft / 29m Boat
Niihau Arches 60ft / 18m Boat
Oceanarium 130ft / 40m Boat
PK 50ft / 15m Shore
Pyramid Point 60ft / 18m Boat
Sheraton Caverns 30ft / 9m Boat
South Point 60ft / 18m Boat
Stairway To Heaven 50ft / 15m Boat
Turtle Bluffs 50ft / 15m Boat
Vertical Awareness 50ft / 15m Boat
Big Island Hawaii ‘Au ‘Au Crater 130ft / 40m Boat
Black Coral Forest 130ft / 40m Boat
Chimney 70ft / 21m Boat
Coral Domes 80ft / 24m Boat
Driftwoods 80ft / 24m Boat
Fantasy Reef 50ft / 15m Boat
Frog Rock 60ft / 18m Boat
Golden Arches 60ft / 18m Boat
Hammerhead Point 100ft / 33m Boat / Shore
Henry’s Cave 65ft / 20m Boat
Horseshoe Bay 60ft / 18m Boat
Kaiwi Point 130ft / 40m Boat
Kiholo Bay 115ft / 15m Boat
Ledges 130ft / 40m Boat
Leleiwi 70ft / 21m Shore
Long Lava Tube 50ft / 15m Boat
Mahai’ula 130ft / 40m Boat
Mahi Reef 60ft / 18m Boat
Makalawena 50ft / 15m Boat
Manta Ray Village 40ft / 12m Boat
Manuka Bay 100ft / 33m Boat
Milemarker 4 60ft / 18m Shore
Milolii 90ft / 27m Boat
Old Airport 60ft / 18m Boat / Shore
Pentagon 30ft / 9m Boat
Pinetrees 100ft / 33m Boat
Poho’iki 100ft / 30m Shore
Puako 90ft / 27m Boat / Shore
Puhi Bay 60ft / 18m Shore
Punalu’u 60ft / 18m Shore
Richardson Beach 20ft / 6m Shore
Robs Reef/Twin Sisters 100ft / 33m Boat
Ruddles 45ft / 14m Boat
Sharkies Cove 50ft / 15m Boat
South Wall 70ft / 21m Boat
Suck-em-Up Caverns 60ft / 18m Boat / Shore
Three Room Cave 80ft / 24m Boat
Turtle Pinnacle 60ft / 18m Boat
Waialea Bay 35ft / 11m Boat / Shore
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I love scuba diving Grand Cayman.  There are a number of great sites from dramatic walls to expansive coral reefs.  Marine life on the reefs is abundant.  Many dive sites on the south, east or north of the island are in excellent shape.  While the dive sites on the west side get a l a lot of traffic the reefs on the wall towards the northwest are awesome.   (StevenWSmeltzer.com)

When scuba diving Grand Cayman you will find an environment that is quite easy to get use to on a daily basis.  Warm waters, short boat rides to dive sites, many dive sites available as a shore dive, many experienced operators and a good night life when you finish your dives.

I have tried to list most of the dive sites from around the island that you may want to consider when scuba diving Grand Cayman   I have also provided links to the dive sites that I have rated to help give you a better feel of the experience you might expect on a particular dive site.  Please review my dive site ratings approach for more information on how I rate an individual dive sites.

The pool is open…..

Dive sites listed by geographical area

AreaNameLatitudeLongitude
North EastJulie's Wall19'21.159N81'09.963W
North EastBabylon19'21.199N81'09.859W
North EastMcCurly’s walls19'21.224N81'09.814W
North EastNorthern Lights19.21.295N81.09.720W
North EastTop Secret19'21.425N81'09.022W
North EastOmega Reef19'21.381N81'08.554W
North EastLittle Bluff19'21.386N81'08.323W
North EastAnchor Point19'21.490N81'07.912W
North EastSplit Rock19'21.524N81'06.753W
North EastFish Tank19'21.405N81'06.418W
North EastBlack Rock Two19'21.381N81'06.302W
North EastBlack Rock Canyon19'21.456N81'06.325W
North EastValley of the Doll19'21.426N81'06.050W
North EastBarrel Sponge wall19'21.417N81'05.972W
North EastTurtle Pass19'21.370N81'05.731W
North EastChubb Hole19'21.028N81'05.057W
North EastCinderella’s Castle19'20.961N81'04.969W
North EastSnapper Hole19'20.649N81'04.670W
North EastDragon's Lair19'20.572N81'04.678W
North SideHepp's Wall19'23.168N81'25.060W
North SideHepp's Pipeline19'23.123N81'24.987W
North SideGhost Mountain19'24.138N81'23.141W
North SideBear's Paw19'23.873N81'21.614W
North SideBlue Pinnacles19'23.630N81'20.737W
North SideHole in the Wall19'23.603N81'20.713W
North SideMain Street19'23.453N81'20.596W
North SideStingray City West19'23.089N81'20.624W
North SideStingray City East19'23.071N81'20.606W
North SideTarpon Alley West19'23.141N81'20.162W
North SideTarpon Alley East19'23.163N81'20.201W
North SidePrincess Penny's Wall19'23.057N81'19.892W
North SideBlack Forest [North]19'23.043N81'19.705W
North SideEagle Ray Pass19'23.031N81'19.495W
North SideLemon Reef19'22.977N81'19.431W
North SideLemon Wall19'23.036N81'19.346W
North SideBlue Peter Reef19'22.977N81'19.321W
North SideLeslie's Curl19'23.030N81'19.214W
North SideHammerhead Hill19'23.038N81'18.545W
North Side3 B's Wall19'23.009N81'18.466W
North SideDream Weaver Reef19'22.919N81'18.218W
North SideChinese Wall19'22.852N81'17.973W
North SideRobert's Wall19'22.846N81'17.882W
North SideGail's Mountain19'22.836N81'17.768W
North SideHaunted House19'22.833N81'17.684W
North SidePinnacle Reef19'22.765N81'17.634W
North SideNo Name Wall19'22.844N81'17.461W
North SideQueen's Throne19'22.801N81'17.476W
North SideWhite Stroke Canyon19'22.886N81'17.298W
North SidePenny's Arch19'22.597N81'15.945W
North SideAndes Wall19'21.891N81'15.173W
North SideAndes Reef19'21.838N81'15.228W
North SideDeila's Delight19'21.537N81'14.718W
South EastGrouper Grotto19'17.777N81'05.159W
South EastScuba Bowl19'17.540N81'05.279W
South EastPat's Wall19'17.576N81'05.341W
South EastMcKennys Canyon19'17.606N81'05.422W
South EastThe Maze19'17.641N81'05.538W
South EastPlaying field19'17.567N81'06.300W
South EastLodge Anchor19'17.434N81'06.741W
South EastThree Sisters19'17.311N81'07.063W
South EastLost Valley19'17.343N81'07.170W
South EastKangaroo Gorge19'17.332N81'07.284W
South EastTarpon Terrace19'17.469N81'07.396W
South EastHigh Rock Drop off19'17.405N81'07.442W
South EastRiver of Sands19'17.436N81'07.546W
South EastIron Shore Gardens19'17.485N81'08.618W
South EastMaggie's Maze19'17.470N81'08.687W
South EastKelly's Caverns19'17.477N81'08.761W
South EastCrusher's Wall19'17.407N81'08.761W
South EastLittle House on the Prairie19'17.473N81'08.889W
South EastTarpon Tap Room19'17.482N81'09.010W
South EastFantasy Land19'17.467N81'09.260W
South SidePublic Yacht Mooring 119'16.244N81'19.384W
South SidePublic Yacht Mooring 219'16.216N81'19.242W
South SidePublic Yacht Mooring 319'16.213N81'19.141W
South SidePublic Yacht Mooring 419'16.187N81'18.943W
South SidePublic Yacht Mooring 519'16.144N81'18.820W
South SideKent's Caves West19'15.513N81'23.179W
South SideKent's Caves East19'15.515N81'23.144W
South SideRon's Wall19'15.551N81'22.665W
South SidePallas Pinnacle West19'15.583N81'22.602W
South SidePallas Pinnacle Central19'15.625N81'22.567W
South SidePallas Pinnacle East19'15.658N81'22.540W
South SidePallas Reef West19'15.729N81'22.705W
South SidePallas Reef East19'15.768N81'22.621W
South SideChristina's Wall19'15.690N81'22.440W
South SideDede's Garden19'15.843N81'22.452W
South SideGary's Reef19'15.837N81'22.392W
South SidePirate's Cove19'15.849N81'22.332W
South SideCrossroads19'15.764N81'22.312W
South SideOllen's Office19'15.777N81'22.238W
South SideEye of the Needle19'15.802N81'22.176W
South SidePhantom Ledge19'15.816N81'22.060W
South SideGary's Wall19'15.825N81'21.986W
South SideNo Name Wall19’15.841N81’21.909W
South SideRed Bay Caves19'15.932N81'22.000W
South SideLaura's Reef19'15.928N81'21.748W
South SideBullwinkle West19'15.937N81'21.689W
South SideBullwinkle East19'15.929N81'21.619W
South SideNed's Tunnels19'15.984N81'21.161W
South SideDangerous Dan's Drop-off19'15.880N81'21.061W
South SideBarracuda Ron's Pass19'15.928N81'20.912W
South SideJapanese Gardens West19'16.068N81'20.841W
South SideJapanese Garden East19'16.099N81'20.719W
South SideSpotts Reef19'16.117N81'18.683W
South SideBats Cave Reef19'16.090N81'18.590W
South SidePedro's Reef19'15.987N81'17.662W
South SidePedro's Pinnacles19'15.806N81'17.521W
West SidePublic Yacht Mooring 119'17.787N81'23.083W
West SidePublic Yacht Mooring 219'17.832N81'27.067W
West SidePublic Yacht Mooring 319'17.954N81'23.080W
West SidePublic Yacht Mooring 419'18.290N81'23.193W
West SidePublic Yacht Mooring 519'18.354N81'23.198W
West SideNorth West Point19'22.165N81'25.240W
West SideDolphin Drop off19'22.153N81'25.182W
West SideBonnie's Arch19'22.228N81'25.170W
West SideOrange Canyon19'22.121N81'25.083W
West SideSentinel Rock19'22.102N81'25.041W
West SideBig Tunnels19'22.096N81'24.991W
West SideEasy Street19'22.075N81'24.953W
West SideIn Between19'22.038N81'24.862W
West SideDragon's Hole19'21.978N81'24.736W
West SideBig Dipper19'21.954N81'24.650W
West SideLittle Tunnels19'21.941N81'24.614W
West SideChain Reef19'22.083N81'24.518W
West SideRound Rock West19'21.894N81'24.488W
West SideRound Rock East19'21.890N81'24.472W
West SideTrinity Caves19'21.890N81'24.430W
West SidePeppermint Reef19'21.947N81'24.369W
West SideNeptune's Wall19'21.820N81'24.330W
West SideSlaughterhouse Wall19'21.778N81'24.243W
West SideWall Street19'21.726N81'24.159W
West SideSand Chute19'21.702N81'24.101W
West SideUSS Kittiwake19'21.702N81'24.101W
West SideDoc Poulson [Wreck]19'21.629N81'23.949W
West SideCemetery Reef
West SideMemorial Reef19’21.743N81’23.892W
West SideMitch Miller Reef19'21.651N81'23.825W
West SideMarty's Wall19'21.607N81'24.000W
West SideKnife19'21.547N81'23.961W
West SideLost Treasure Reef19'21.231N81'23.604W
West SideSpanish Anchor19'21.174N81'23.613W
West SideThree Trees19'21.028N81'23.573W
West SideBolero19'20.871N81'23.544W
West SideAngelfish Reef19'20.762N81'23.512W
West SideAquarium19'20.695N81'23.460W
West SideGreat House Wall19'20.589N81'23.559W
West SideKiller Puffer19'20.620N81'23.444W
West SidePeter's Reef19'20.566N81'23.431W
West SideEagle's Nest19'20.484N81'23.525W
West SideJax Dax19'20.451N81'23.403W
West SideParadise Reef19'20.352N81'23.395W
West SideOro Verde [stern]19'20.314N81'23.429W
West SideOro Verde [bow]19'20.292N81'23.423W
West SideHoliday Inn Drop-off19'20.266N81'23.511W
West SideHammerhead Hole19'20.173N81'23.347W
West SideWildlife Reef19'19.874N81'23.389W
West SideCaribbean Club Sand Chute19'19.928N81'23.500W
West SideLone Star Reef/Ledges19'19.620N81'23.458W
West SideMesa19'19.301N81'23.585W
West SideRoyal Palms Ledge19'19.137N81'23.597W
West SidePageant Beach Reef19'18.388N81'23.299W
West SideSoto's North19'18.157N81'23.131W
West SideFish Pot Reef19'18.005N81'23.119W
West SideEden Rock North19'17.618N81'23.227W
West SideEden Rock South19'17.586N81'23.236W
West SideDevils Grotto North19'17.549N81'23.250W
West SideDevils Grotto South19'17.499N81'23.295W
West SideL.C.M. David Nicholson19'17.241N81'23.557W
West SideArmchair Reef19'16.771N81'23.655W
West SideSmith Cove19'16.546N81'23.591W
West SideEagle Ray Rock19'16.444N81'23.712W
West SideBlackie's Hole19'16.337N81'23.736W
West SideBlack Forest19'16.269N81'23.737W

 

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Shark Week is an annual, week-long TV programming block created by Tom Golden at the Discovery Channel.  This annual series of programs provide some awesome information on these wonderful creatures.

Shark Week (Steven W Smeltzer)

White-tip Reef Shark, Triaenodon obesus, mano lalakea, Maui Hawaii

Shark Week originally premiered on July 17, 1988. Featured annually, in late July and/or early August, it was originally devoted to conservation efforts and correcting misconceptions about sharks. Over time Shark Week grew in popularity and became a hit on the Discovery Channel. Since 2010, Shark Week has been the longest-running cable television programming event in history. Now broadcast in over 72 countries, Shark Week is promoted heavily via social networks like Facebook and Twitter. Episodes of recent years are also available for purchase on services like Google Play Movies & TV/YouTube, Amazon Video, and iTunes. Some episodes are free on subscription-based Hulu.

Shark Week (Steven W Smeltzer)

Shark Week

Since its early days, Shark Week has evolved into more entertainment-oriented and sometimes fictional programming. In recent times, it has attracted much criticism for airing dramatic programs to increase viewers and popularity. This fictitious programming, known as docufiction, has been produced in the last few years. Examples of such programs include Megalodon: The Monster Shark Lives, Shark of Darkness: Wrath of Submarine, Monster Hammerhead, Lair of the Mega Shark, and Megaladon: The New Evidence.

This strategy was hugely successful, especially for the program Megalodon: The Monster Shark Lives, as it became one of the most watched programs in Shark Week history, primarily for the controversy and backlash it generated. The mockumentary was based on an ancient giant shark called megalodon, which is now long extinct. The airing of this program fueled an uproar by viewers and by the science and science-loving community.[4] It eventually started a Discovery Channel boycott.[4] Since then Discovery has increasingly come under fire for using junk science, pushing dubious theories, creating fake stories and misleading scientists as to the nature of the documentary being produced

 

The pool is open…..

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